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Who should read this book?

Should you read Science and Religion: Reconciling the Conflicts?

Do. If you believe that truth is truth—from whatever source.

Do. If you’d like to understand better why so many scientific date estimates contradict Bible Chronology.

Don’t. If you are totally convinced that science is not only the sole provider of real truth, but also its arbiter, and that religion has nothing positive to offer. This book will probably just annoy you and cause venom to spew from your pen.

Do. If you are trying to decide whether to put your faith in God, in science, or some in each, read this book and find some promising possibilities for reconciling the conflicts.

Don’t. If you are totally convinced that the only reality is the physical—that spiritual matters are just fantasy, you probably won’t enjoy this book.

Do. If you are open to the possibility that there might be a reality beyond the realm of the physical—out of reach of modern technology, you’ll likely enjoy this book.

Do. If you’d like to hear some unusual, but plausible possibilities for reconciling some of the conflicts between science and a rather literal approach to the Bible, read this book.

Don’t. If you are convinced that all aspects of conventional science are tested and true, don’t read this book, it will probably cause you heartburn.

Do. If you haven’t closed your mind to receiving truth from either science or religion, you’ll probably enjoy some intriguing theories which seem to lead in the direction of reconciling the conflicts.

Don’t. If you are convinced that science—in practice—is totally objective and proven beyond any doubt, don’t read this book, it just might provoke you to anger.

Do. If you are a Bible-believer and would like to learn of some unusual, but promising possibilities in support of many of your beliefs, read this book.

Don’t. If you believe that the universe and this Earth just happened by chance, and that God is just a human invention, you probably won’t enjoy this book.

Do. If you allow for the possibility that there is truth to be found in the Bible—you might really enjoy this book and gain some valuable insights.

Don’t. If you are an atheist—convinced that there is no God—you probably shouldn’t read this book. If you do, you will likely be filled with disdain and be inclined to mock this effort—which would not be good for either you or me.

Do. If you recognize that the existence of God cannot be proved or disproved by science, you just might gain some intriguing insights.

Do. If you believe that the case for intelligent design is worth consideration–in contrast to everything springing from random change—from disorder to order.

Don’t. If you are absolutely convinced that scientific results are so well tested and proven that the scriptural accounts of major catastrophes (like Noah’s Flood) are just myth.

Do. If you allow for the possibility that there is a God who cares and who influences this mortal realm.

It has been said that faith is necessary in both science and religion. For either position, one has faith that the inferences they’ve drawn from the facts are correct.

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